Where Was God?

This is a question often asked in relationship to our pain.

We ask this question when a loved one dies, when we get a devastating doctor’s report, when our best friend gets involved in a car wreck that leaves them paralyzed, when we lose a job unfairly or unexpectedly, when we lose a home to foreclosure.

Or, perhaps we ask this question in light of tragic events that happen around us…natural disasters, sex trafficking, rape, murder, suicide, school shootings, gang violence, police brutality…the list seems endless.

The shooting in Orlando is obviously fresh on everyone’s mind at the moment, and my heart certainly goes out to the families of the victims…but my aim in writing this is not to draw more attention to that specific event.

Instead, I want to try and tackle the question referenced in the title.

Not an easy task, because most of the time this question is asked in anger and frustration. And it’s directly connected to an older and even more difficult question:

Why does God allow evil?

As much as we would like to, believers can’t shirk away from this kind of stuff either…because whether we like it or not, it is a fair question. I obviously can’t answer either of these questions completely, but I want to at least offer a few points that can serve as food for thought. I’ll be borrowing heavily from an awesome book that I recommend to every parent by author Natasha Crain, entitled “Keeping Your Kids On God’s Side”.

The fact that evil exists is one of the biggest arguments that atheists attempt to use against God. Their basic premise is, “If there is a God, and He’s completely good, then He wouldn’t allow evil“. This seems logical at first glance, but there’s a huge catch: doing away with evil would also do away with free will. If God made everyone do good, no one would be have the freedom to chose otherwise.

Well, that still doesn’t explain natural disasters.

The typical Christian answer to this is the fall of man, and that Adam’s sin in the Garden of Eden corrupted not only humanity, but all of creation as well. Granted, that is the correct answer, but to a non-believer with little to no faith in the Bible, it really doesn’t mean much.

In her book, Crain states this very effectively, and gives an interesting take on the issue of natural disasters. She points out that natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes, are actually “the byproduct of good processes”. For example, earthquakes come about as a result of the shifting of the Earth’s tectonic plates, a process that is necessary for our survival, but also a process that, unfortunately, does hurt and kill innocent people at times.

These are amongst a long list of answers that make sense logically, but let’s be honest: anyone who has just experienced a traumatic event in their life will not be comforted by logic. What can we as believers do when hurting people are overcome by their emotions and angry with God?

The answer is simple: we demonstrate the love of Jesus.

You see, we may never answer the question of where God was to a hurting person’s satisfaction, no matter how right or logical our answer may be. But no one can argue against genuine, Godly love.

Who knows? Maybe your loving presence could be the very tool that God uses to explain His “absence”.

Of Course God Is Real…Isn’t He?

What real evidence do you have that God exists?

Science clearly proves that there is no God.

All of that stuff in the Bible is just fantasy.

The Bible isn’t reliable; it’s been misinterpreted, and it’s full of contradictions.

If God were real, why is there all this suffering and evil in the world?

If you’ve never been confronted with any of these questions or statements, get ready. The climate now in our society is uncomfortably biased towards an atheistic mindset, and is becoming increasingly hostile towards the Christian worldview.

Of course, those of us who’ve at least skimmed over the New Testament aren’t really surprised or devastated by this.

But the hard truth is, there aren’t really many of us believers who can give a clear, objective answer to any of the queries listed above. Honestly, most of what we say in response to stuff like this is based on our own personal experience with God. This is certainly valid in and of itself, but in the eyes of most hard-nosed skeptics, it’s irrelevant. They consider your personal testimony as completely subjective and therefore inadmissible as true evidence.

“Well…so what? Who cares what they think? I know God is real to me, and that’s all that matters.”

This is the easy way out, and one I fear that too many believers (myself included) are more inclined to take. Here’s the problem with it, though: you and I may feel secure enough in our faith to be unshaken by such opposition…

but what about our children?

What about the next generation? This generation who, from Pre-K to College, is being indoctrinated with the theory of evolution, and being blatantly encouraged to either reject God outright, or to embrace religious pluralism…in layman’s terms, to “COEXIST”? What about our kids whose iTunes are in many cases chock-full of music that is aggressively anti-Christ? What about our kids who are bombarded daily with social media that promotes just about everything that God forbids?

What about many of our kids who only know church…but don’t really know God?

Don’t get me wrong…I am in no way saying that we need to worry ourselves with trying to prove God’s existence; He’s real whether anyone believes it or not. But I do believe that we need to at least be able to speak to the hard questions that many people today have. And even more importantly, we need to prepare and equip our children, whose faith in many cases is shaky at best, and who could easily be swayed by just one persuasive atheist.

We are told in 1 Peter 3:15 to “be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear”. I believe that God is leading me, both as a father and as an aspiring writer, to get to the place where I can do just that, and also to equip others to be able to do the same.

So, for the handful of readers that I have at the moment, be on the lookout here and there for some blogs that deal specifically with some of the current obstacles to having faith in God…obstacles that we as believers can help many non-believers to overcome.

A Lesson In Love…

I thought I really knew how to love…now I’m not so sure.

It’s not that I’m completely clueless when it comes to love. Believe me, being married for 8 years and having two daughters will teach you a thing or two about it…whether you want to learn or not. And I can imagine that many of you reading this probably know at least the basic concepts of love.

For some of us, it’s the natural byproduct of growing up in a love-filled household.

For others, it comes from the destructive aftermath of bad relationships or circumstances, where we learned precisely what love is NOT.

It really doesn’t matter whether you got your love education from “Easy Street Academy” or the “School of Hard Knocks”…neither one of those life schools can really give you all there is to know about love. Our human experiences, no matter how enlightening they may be, don’t adequately teach us how to love purely. The reason for this is quite simple: we as human beings, whether we want to admit it or not, are flawed, limited, and, by nature…wait for it…selfish.

Yes…selfish. It’s such an ugly word that defines an even uglier character trait. I doubt anyone in their right mind likes being tagged with it, but the reality is, it’s something engrained within all of us. What makes it even worse is how sneaky it can be. Selfishness doesn’t always look like selfishness.

Case in point…for her birthday this past April, my insanely beautiful wife asked me to take her out to one of her favorite restaurants. I was all too eager to do it, because I always look forward to any exclusive “us” time we can get. I was on Cloud 9…until I got a call from her on my way home from work that completely soured my mood. What, you may ask, did she say that turned my cheesy grin into an ugly frown?

My lovely wife had the nerve to invite some friends to dinner with us.

WHAT?!! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!! We have the rare opportunity of a nice evening to ourselves, and you want to muck it up by inviting other people? Come on, babe…this was supposed to be our night out, a break away from the kids, from work, from the cares of life…I mean, nights like this are few and far between, and you know this. WHAT ARE YOU THINKING?!!!

I had a nasty attitude nearly the entire ride to the restaurant…until my wife gently reminded me of the reason for us going out in the first place…it was for her birthday.

See what I mean? Do you see how easy it is for us to turn even a well-intentioned act of kindness into something that is self-serving? This, my friends, is why we will NEVER learn to love right without Jesus.

Speaking of which, judging from my “love-flop” just now, I think I need to check back into His love school.

Which Jesus?

This could just be me…but it seems like there are large chunks of Jesus’ character and personality that don’t get a lot of press nowadays.

You know what I mean?

It’s as if both secular society, and unfortunately much of the church, is on some kind of desperate PR campaign aimed at making Jesus as politically correct and agreeable to everyone as possible.

The “Jesus” being propagated today is all love and no bite. He’s never said a sharp word to anybody; He’s incapable of getting the least bit angry. He’s not confrontational…in fact, He’ll only get in your face on FaceBook, when He pops up on your newsfeed occasionally with a cheesy grin to say “I love ya”.

He’s pretty chill, too; all He requires of you is that you be the nicest person you can be. Just live your life and let Him be a part of it every once in awhile. Don’t worry too much about the “S” word…you know…sin. It’s not as big a deal as some people make it out to be.

And this whole “Son of God” business? Well, Jesus didn’t really mean that literally. He’s simply an excellent moral teacher, maybe even a prophet, who only taught about love, equality, non-discrimination, and good works. He’s a great example amongst other great examples, a philosopher whose teachings are applicable to certain life situations…but He’s not really someone that we are accountable to.

Or is He?

Please don’t believe the hype. Jesus is so much more than a lovey-dovey, people-pleasing pacifist whose goal is to get people to like Him and to make us happy. This weak, anemic “Jesus” is not the one I know.

The One I know indeed epitomizes love…and that same love is demonstrated both in meekness and in righteous indignation. He graciously reaches out His hands to those who are dubbed as rejects by society, and He has a sharp word or two for those who hypocritically look down their noses at others, without first considering their own faults.

He can condemn sin and yet pardon the sinner, all in the same breath. In fact, He’s the only judge who’s ever handed out a death sentence, and then got up from the judge’s bench to take it Himself. His words are not just words to live by…they are the words of life itself. Oh, yeah…and as far as confrontation is concerned, He confronted death itself on mankind’s behalf…and made a fool out of it.

Speaking of confrontation, I’d like to confront you now with a question…which Jesus do you know?

 

Proud To Be a Prisoner…

“How can I say I’m free…
Have life abundantly…
Talk about having liberty…
But still be a prisoner?”

– Deon Kipping

This is what you call a paradox – a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement or proposition that, when investigated or explained, may prove to be well founded or true.

In other words, it’s when an idea doesn’t make sense until you take a closer look.

For obvious reasons, the idea of having freedom is not ordinarily associated with being a prisoner. The words “freedom” and “prisoner” carry completely different connotations – when you say or hear them, they stir up feelings that are polar opposites.

One word brings to mind the image of running through a wide open, flowery meadow on a blue-skied and sunny day, without a care in the world…

…the other drops you into a dank, dreary, enclosed space with cold iron bars and a lingering sense of hopelessness.

How in the world can these two words, these two ideas, ever be compatible?

You may want to run that question by the apostle Paul. Paul had this silly notion that being a prisoner of Christ was the most freeing state of being there could ever be.

Before I delve into his logic, however, I feel the need to explain something, particularly for any skeptics out there. Whether we want to admit it or not, we are all bound to or by something. All of us, for instance, are bound by space and time…outside of death, there’s simply no escaping it. And although not all of us follow them, in general we are bound to rules and laws, whether they be the laws of nature, of a certain nation or government, or even those self-imposed boundaries that you yourself choose to live within.

Paul, being the brilliant scholar that he was, logically concluded that all of mankind is bound by something else too…it’s called sin. It’s a cruel taskmaster, offering you a moment of pleasure, all the while wrapping a chain around you and dragging you further and further into its dungeon…and ultimately to your death.

But…Paul also concluded that Jesus Christ died on the cross to free us from this bondage, and to offer us His gift of eternal life. In his overwhelming gratitude for being loosed from his own chains of sin, Paul frequently dubbed himself a “prisoner of Christ”, a seemingly shameful title that he bore with pride. It’s a title I personally believe that all those who have been freed by Jesus should embrace.

And as for those still bound by sin, you have a choice to make…do you remain bound by sin, or choose freedom in Jesus? In essence, do you want a death sentence…or a life sentence?

Take your pick.

“Chained…to His will,
Tied…to His word,
He has my life,
I’m a prisoner of Christ”

– Deon Kipping

The Comfort Zone

Hi……….my name is Wayne………..and I’m a recovering caution-olic.

See what I did there?

I know that’s not proper English, but when it comes to describing my personality, it’s pretty spot on. I’ve always been one to air on the side of caution, in nearly every aspect of my life. It’s taken quite some time for me to even peek my head out of my shell, let alone come out of it completely.

So as you can imagine, I’ve heard plenty of well-meaning people emphasize to me the importance of coming out of my “comfort zone”. Preachers in particular absolutely love to include this notion in their sermons. And being a church kid, and having heard this idea preached for most of my life, I believed for the longest time that God was obsessed with making me uncomfortable.

There is some merit to this notion, and it certainly preaches well, but I’ve come to the conclusion now that it’s an incomplete concept.

Why? Because comfort is one of the things that God does best.

It’s no coincidence that God is referred to as the God of “all comfort” in 2 Corinthians 1:3. In other words, there is no real comfort apart from God. Anybody who has a real relationship with Him can attest to this fact.

I think it’s safe to conclude then that God is not in the business of making us uncomfortable for the fun of it. Instead, I believe He uses our pain, our sorrow, our discomfort, to draw us into His arms…where He longs to comfort us like no one else ever could.

To put it another way, it’s not just about coming out of our comfort zone: it’s about moving into His comfort zone.

So go ahead…make yourself comfortable.

Don’t Leave The Cross Behind

 

Just a heads up…this one might sting a little.

I was watching a crucifixion documentary the day before Easter, and I was a bit troubled by the conclusion that the commentators drew concerning Jesus’ death.

According to their viewpoint, Jesus was killed because He became a political threat to the Romans, who just viewed Him as another “crazy Jew” with the potential to stir up unwanted trouble for the empire. In other words, Jesus didn’t willingly die for the sins of you and I…He was simply the martyr of a botched socio-political revolution.

And I was all set to pitch a fit…until something else occurred to me: what if them coming to that conclusion isn’t their fault? What if we Christians are to blame?

Think about it…we feel sooooooo compelled to emphasize the cross during this time of year, from Holy Week to Good Friday, leading up to Easter Sunday. Everything about our Easter services is aimed at celebrating and pointing others to the cross. The problem is, after the festivities have ended, we walk out the door with our fingers still pointing towards the cross, but we leave it behind.

The hard truth is, the cross doesn’t get the same press in our everyday lives as it does during Easter. It’s been less than two weeks since Resurrection Sunday, and as much as we hate to admit it, much of our “cross fever” has died down. It’s not that we don’t ever think about the cross anymore; it’s just…it’s just not as big a deal as it was a couple weeks ago.

Is it any wonder then that much of secular society has a skewed idea of what the cross is all about?

Like I said…stings a little bit.

How Far Will You Go?

That was a question posed to our congregation a couple of Sundays ago, via a message preached by my Dad. In short, Dad challenged us to dismantle our religious barriers and take the gospel to those that religion would disqualify, those that don’t fit our “churchy mold”, those that we wouldn’t want other churchfolk to see us hanging with…you get the idea, don’t you?

I was very convicted by this message to say the least.

I’ve got a great religious pedigree. I was raised in the church, got saved at age 12, and I’m a preacher’s kid…needless to say, I’m pretty well churched.  There’s nothing wrong with any of that, but unfortunately I allowed my “churchiness” to get in the way at times of a geniune relationship with Jesus.

For many years after I was saved, I was a full-blown Pharisee…and didn’t even know it. I put so much stock on how pious and holy I appeared to other people, and I didn’t fully grasp the fact that I can look awesome to people and raggedy to God.

Thankfully, God has really opened my eyes to this in recent years…painfully at times, but it’s been well worth it. And of course He’s still working on me, but I thank Him for the growth that I’m seeing. A recent experience I had was proof of this for me.

A few weeks ago, I was invited to lunch by some of my coworkers. Not really a big deal…but remember my religious pedigree? Here are some of the thoughts that immediately flashed thru my religious mind:

“The restaurant has ‘ale house’ in the name, and it has a bar. I just got ordained as an Elder…what if people I know see me there?”

“There are 4 of us – 2 guys and 2 girls…what if someone sees me and thinks I’m cheating on my wife or something?”

“I just don’t want my good to be ‘evil spoken of’…”

I was all set to decline the invitation, but then felt an urge to go that I didn’t fully understand at first.

Now, here I am: a former Pharisee and a newly ordained Elder…in an ale house…with 3 coworkers who are sipping on drinks that are not “virgin” at all. And I’m here because GOD told me to be?!!

Eventually, though, I began to relax…not because of any drink (FYI, I had water), but because the Holy Spirit began to reveal why He had told me to go. The conversation started with small talk, but then took an interesting shift to some of the things that we all were going thru at the moment.

I was able to minister to my coworkers in an ale house, while they were sipping on drinks, simply by being relatable and having a listening ear. One of them even commented and said, “Wayne, you should be a preacher”, to which I sheepishly replied, “Actually, I am”. They were pleasantly surprised by this, and each of them pointed out that they knew something was different about me, but just couldn’t put their fingers on what it was.

What is my point in saying all of this? Well, if we claim to have any relationship with Jesus, then we have to be willing to get as uncomfortable as He got to reach those that religion has shunned.

How far did Jesus go?

I could spend the whole day breaking that down, but just know this: He went infinitely farther than any of us could ever imagine.

I think the real question is…how far will you go? Continue reading “How Far Will You Go?”

A Lesson In Humility…

Jesus never ceases to amaze me…

I know this is a blatantly obvious and seemingly pointless statement, but hear me out.

My current amazement with Jesus has little to do with His “front and center” characteristics…you know, His omni-potence, His omni-presence, His omni-science, His holiness, His incomparable love, His grace and mercy, His overwhelming compassion for others…you and I both know that the list is endless!

But the character trait that I am stuck on at the moment is His humility.

I’m dumbfounded by this, because of all the people who have a bonified right to stick their chest out and be a little “big-headed”, Jesus would be it. I mean, aside from all of the incredible attributes I listed above, Jesus is perfectly righteous and good. The Bible literally states in 1 John 1:5 that “He is light, and in Him there is no darkness”. There is not a shred of evil in Jesus at all…PERIOD.

This reality hit me particularly hard as I was reading thru Matthew 3 the other day.

John the Baptist was doing his thing, preparing the way for Jesus, downplaying his own role and consistently emphasizing that “a greater one was coming”. John did such a great job of hyping Jesus up that Jesus later said of him that there was none greater in fulfilling his role.

Now, you would think that upon His arrival, Jesus would have taken advantage of such great PR. But instead, Jesus foregoes the grand entrance and asks John to baptize Him. That’s really nothing new to Bible-readers, but the Holy Spirit pointed out something very significant to me: Jesus came to John in the same manner that sinners came. He didn’t come on the heels of the hype John had manufactured; He came the way of the sinner, yet having no sin.

It would almost look like this in modern times: if Jesus were to come to church, we’d expect Him to come in escorted by a bunch of armorbearers, with a preacher’s robe on, and welcomed by a standing ovation and loud, boisterous music. But in reality, His “grand entrance” looked something more like this: the preacher makes the altar call appeal, and Jesus is the one who comes walking down the altar…not to applause, but probably to a bunch of strange, questioning, and judgmental looks.

I think I’ll keep this picture in mind the next time I get too full of myself. How about you?

A Lesson On Patience…

Sooooo…I’m in the midst of a pretty difficult lesson in patience right now, courtesy of God Himself. It’s funny, because I figured I had a pretty good handle on patience already.

Shows how much I know (smile).

Here’s the short version of it: my wife and I have been praying and believing God for financial freedom for quite awhile now, and it’s not for the reason you might think. Of course, I want us to be well off financially for our own benefit…not struggling to pay bills, saving more money than we spend, being able to send both kids off to college with no problem, living comfortably within our means, etc., etc., etc…

But there is another, much more important reason for our desire to be financially prosperous…and that is to be a blessing to whomever we can. You see, I have this crazy dream of walking down the street on any given day, seeing someone in need, and being able to give generously without even missing it. I know that may not be a lofty dream to anyone else, but it’s a big deal to me.

The funny thing is, God has already promised us that He would do it! But I’m just going to be honest here: while this assurance of His has definitely been a source of comfort, it’s also a source of some frustration.

I mean, God…really….WHY NOT JUST DO IT ALREADY?!!

There are so many people with millions of dollars who aren’t the least bit concerned about helping anyone else. You see my heart…you know I’m not in that category…you know I want to be a conduit, a channel for your blessings to flow through to anyone willing to receive. WHAT’S TAKING SO LONG?!!

If you’ve ever been here before, then you know that God is patient enough to hear us out when we have “temper tantrums” like this. And, like the loving father He is, He’s teaching me something that I never really considered before: He’s actually more concerned about me having patience than about me having money.

I know this doesn’t sound profound or anything, so let me put it another way. I think God is showing me that the most significant reward for waiting on His promise is not the promise itself, but rather the patience I gain in the process.

Again, not an easy lesson, but it is SOOOOOO WORTH IT!!!

Writing For His Glory…

That’s really the jist of this…nothing more, nothing less. I’m not all that interested in gaining followers, getting a whole lot of “likes”, or even trying to tell more about myself.

Truthfully…all anyone really needs to know about me is that Jesus saved me from my sin and from myself, and I’m running after Him with reckless abandon. Everyday, I’m becoming more and more fascinated with Him, and I’m learning how to love Him with all my heart, all my mind, and all my strength.

I just pray that He will use my life (and these written words) to point everyone I meet to Him.

The Solid Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride

A sticky post with a regular landscape featured image on the corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

The internet is really changing the way people relate to these issues — the woman who is being paid two cents an hour to make your sweater, even like twenty years an hour to  ago was very far away.

On the corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County? Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill

Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

disting-1A nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill Adam Robertson, is Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

All images are under copyright © Laurent Nivalle

The Oddest Place You Will Find A Gentleman

On the corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

The internet is really changing the way people relate to these issues — the woman who is being paid two cents an hour to make your sweater, even like twenty years an hour to  ago was very far away.

On the corner of a nondescript block in Lancaster County? Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill

Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

girl-align-rightA nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill Adam Robertson, is Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

All images are under copyright © Laurent Nivalle

The Sweet Success of Failure

Stewart Butterfield is about a portrait image post has a problem the rest of us can only dream of. His business has turned into a runaway train. Daily users of his product, Slack — aimed at helping corporate teams communicate better — have grown from 10,000 to 90,000 in just five months.

Various extra features, called complication, such as moon-phase displays and the different types of tourbillon, are sometimes included. Modern watches often display the day, date, month and year, and electronic. Various extra features, called complication, such as moon-phase displays and the different types of tourbillon, are sometimes included. Daily users of his product, Slack — aimed at helping corporate teams communicate better — have grown from 10,000 to 90,000 in just five months.

I must therefore warn that well-known character, the general reader, that I am here embarked upon a most distasteful business: taking down the picture from the wall and looking on the back.

success-1The art of literature stands apart from among its sisters, because the material in which the literary artist works is the dialect of life; hence, on the one hand, a strange freshness and immediacy of address to the public mind, which is ready prepared to understand it; but hence, on the other, a singular limitation.

THE REPORT, THOUGH A PIECE OF JOURNALISTIC CONJECTURE, AFTERWARDS PROVED TO BE VERY NEAR TO THE MARK. IT WAS TO THE EFFECT THAT GERMANY HAD DECLARED WAR AGAINST RUSSIA AND ALSO FRANCE, AND THAT HER TROOPS WERE ALREADY POURING OVER THE RESPECTIVE FRONTIERS.

Hitherto they had overcome the initial difficulty that confronts British road users in France—the fact that all traffic keeps, or is supposed to keep, to the right.

success-2With half-closed throttles, and tyres sufficiently soft to absorb most of the shocks, the young tourists bumped over the pavé, swung round, and soon settled down to a modest fifteen miles an hour along the Namur road.

A nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill Adam Robertson, is Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

All images are under copyright © Laurent Nivalle

What the Beatles Could Learn from Bikes

Most inexpensive and medium-priced watches, used mainly for timekeeping, are electronic watches with quartz movements. Expensive collectible watches, valued more for their elaborate craftsmanship, aesthetic appeal and glamorous design than for simple timekeeping, often have purely mechanical movements and are powered by springs, even though these movements are generally less accurate and more expensive than electronic ones.

Various extra features, called complication, such as moon-phase displays and the different types of tourbillon, are sometimes included. Modern watches often display the day, date, month and year, and electronic.

I must therefore warn that well-known character, the general reader, that I am here embarked upon a most distasteful business: taking down the picture from the wall and looking on the back.

Hello! What's the excitement?
Hello! What’s the excitement?

The art of literature stands apart from among its sisters, because the material in which the literary artist works is the dialect of life; hence, on the one hand, a strange freshness and immediacy of address to the public mind, which is ready prepared to understand it; but hence, on the other, a singular limitation.

The report, though a piece of journalistic conjecture, afterwards proved to be very near to the mark. It was to the effect that Germany had declared war against Russia and also France, and that her troops were already pouring over the respective frontiers.

Hitherto they had overcome the initial difficulty that confronts British road users in France—the fact that all traffic keeps, or is supposed to keep, to the right.

what-beatles-2
There’s something in the wind, old chap.

With half-closed throttles, and tyres sufficiently soft to absorb most of the shocks, the young tourists bumped over the pavé, swung round, and soon settled down to a modest fifteen miles an hour along the Namur road.

A nondescript block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker.

Inside, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill Adam Robertson, is Block in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is a bank, or what used to be a bank. Now it is the home of Roland G. Murphy Watch Company, the country’s only truly independent elite watchmaker. Inside, Murphy’s son-in-law, Adam Robertson, is bent over an old watchmaker’s drill press that looks like it was made during the Korean War.

All images are under copyright © Laurent Nivalle